RICHARDSON - Richardson’s Neighborhood Video Crime Watch is keeping an eye on the community, using home and business surveillance systems to help police officers in the fight against crime.

“It takes a village, and the safest community are those that are engaged heavily with their police department. We can’t be everywhere all the time,” said Jimmy Spivey, Chief of Police.

The Neighborhood Video Crime Watch program started eight years ago with about 100 registered people. It now has more than 600 home and business owners participating and willing to share their footage with police.

“Video is fantastic, you really can’t dispute what you see on video. Things are captured by video surveillance that might not be seen by the resident or by police when the offense is committed,” said Richardson Police Officer Tommy Davis with the department’s Crime Prevention.

When people sign up for the Neighborhood Video Crime Watch program, their contact information is securely added to a database and available for officers to access. It includes the type of surveillance equipment being used, the number of cameras on the property and their exact locations.

“It’s very beneficial. I mean, if the police don’t know that you have cameras, they don’t know to ask for the footage. I have shared my footage numerous times to help solve police investigations,” said Jeff Millstead, a Richardson Resident and participant in the program.

Information obtained through surveillance systems has come in handy. Over the years, footage from cameras have assisted in solving many cases. It’s also brought people a sense of comfort.

Visit www.cor.net/videocrimewatch for more information including how to register for the program.